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Stonefly review | PC Gamer

Need to know

What is it? An action-adventure game where you explore a tiny world using insect-inspired mechs.
Expect to pay £15
Developer Flight School Studios
Publisher MWM Interactive
Reviewed on AMD Ryzen 5 3600, 8GB, AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT
Multiplayer No
Link Official website 

Mechs in games are usually huge, hulking killing machines that can punch through buildings and crunch the earth beneath them as they stomp about. 100-tonnes of pure metal and rust, ready to unleash destruction and chaos. But the mechs in the adventure game Stonefly are not like that. Sure, you’re still controlling a machine, but Stonefly’s miniature mechs are light on their robotic feet, hopping and gliding with ease.

Developer Flight School Studio has left the electrifying pinball hack-n-slash action of Creature in the Well and the chilling ghost stories of Manifest 99 behind for a tranquil jaunt through nature. Stonefly is an adventure game that puts a magnifying glass over a forest’s undergrowth, letting us take a peek at an entire bug ecosystem all from the safety of the world’s smallest mech.

Although Stonefly’s fusion of nature and engineering make for an exciting world, the game’s loop of frustrating resource grinding and mission repetition stops this adventure from taking full flight.

Stonefly

(Image credit: MWM Interactive)

You play as a young engineer and inventor named Annika who’s on a quest to find a lost family heirloom. A mysterious individual has stolen her father’s rig, which was down to Annika, and so she goes on a journey to find and return it. Soon enough she meets the Acorn Corps, a group of castaways in search of an elusive piece of folklore called the Crystal Phantom. Piloting your own bug-like robot, you’ll need to help Annika search the dizzying highs and dangerous lows of the forest’s miniature hidden world.

The first rig you take command of feels as light as a dandelion seed, and it’s visually designed that way too. Landing a mech gently on a leaf and gliding through the undergrowth on a breeze feels lovely

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